Can a goalkeeper make use of optical illusions to stop penalty kicks?

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AS A WARRIOR WHO USES A HUGE MASK FOR MORE FIERCE LOOKING YOUR ENEMY, A GOALKEEPER CAN DECEIVE THE PLAYER CHANGING THE PERCEPTION OF ITS SIZE

Everything is a matter of perception. Think of the striker scoring a goal; While scoring more easier it seems you write down and literally begins to perceive that the goal is bigger than it really is. Our actions change our own perceptions, but can change those of others?

According to a small study published in 2008, goalkeepers can influence the direction and effectiveness of a penalty kick by adopting a stance that mimics one of the most classic optical illusions.

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The Müller-Lyer illusion consists of two parallel lines that end in arrowheads pointing in opposite directions. Although the two lines are exactly the same, people normally perceive a as larger than the other, which is normally explained in terms of depth and perspective: assume that one is more far than the other.

Usually the studies are focused on abstract figures used in laboratory experiments, but the psychologists John van der Kamp and Rich Masters have decided to examine this effect in action, seeing if a goalkeeper is able to affect the prospect of their opponents.

In football, the goal is a framework of 7.3 by 2.43 m and the penalty kicks are thrown from a distance of 11m at an average speed of 110 km/hr. The goalkeeper has so little time to react; the odds are against her. However, a goalkeeper can anticipate the direction of a shot if you know how to read your opponent’s movements and, according to van der Kamp and Masters, standing slightly out of the Centre of the goal.

For their study, psychologists showed photographs of porters in four different positions to 15 students. The result was that invariably, when goalkeepers they raised arms were perceived as higher when they kept them down.

In addition, researchers conducted another study to determine how this effect affected the certainty when it comes to shots. As it is known that the aim is greater pulling with your hands than feet, scientists used simulations of shots of handball. You were asked then to 24 students to launch shots to a screen where you were projected images of the goalkeepers in the previous experiment. High speed cameras were used to measure shots and determine at what distance from the middle of the goal line were targeted. The study showed that while larger was perceived the Porter, further away from it is shooting the ball.

Thus, the study suggests that, indeed, the goalkeeper is able to affect the perception of the shooter and, if it manages to seem smaller, shots will be closer to that if it is perceived as largest.